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Bench-1 workbench computer quick-reference guide (QRG) pages


This page is like an appendix to my workbench computers page.  I gave a little description at the end of that page.


DIP switches:
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reset circuit:
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clock source:
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address decoding:
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DE-9F connections, for main RS-232:
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ACIA1 crystal circuit:
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ACIA2 circuit (primarily for MIDI and Lynx wireless connections)
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MIDI cable to musical keyboard:
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ACIA3 circuit (which was intended for tape modem, which is now obsolete):
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A/D converter circuit:
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There's another page farther down showing how this is connected to the outside world.


DIP header for A/D's op amp parts:
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D/A converter circuit:
picture

There's another page farther down showing how this is connected to the outside world.


SS22 interface:
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parallel printer connector pinout:
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the mass of stuff interfaced via VIA1
From top to bottom: NMI is used with T1 for realtime clock & calendar, plus Abort key circuit; then there's a synchronous-serial port, beeper, printer, LCD, keypad, Abort circuit, and I²C:
picture


front panel layout:
picture
The round A/D and D/A connectors are 3.5mm 3-conductor jacks.

The four larger annunciator LEDs here are turned on and off by software, so you can use them to monitor where you are in a program.  In Forth, you can use lines like

   TURN ON #2 LED
or
   TURN OFF #4 LED
where TURN is a variable, ON sets it to $FFFF and OFF clears it, #2 and #4 are the names of constants made to be 2 and 4, and LED turns the named LED on or off according to what's in variable TURN.  The #4 LED feed is also brought out to one of the oscilloscope probe points on the front so you can use it to trigger a sweep as you watch another circuit, or just watch something that's too fast to see flashing.


remote LCD and keypad header:
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remote keypad diagram:
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front-panel Abort key circuit:
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front-panel I²C port (compatible with I2C-6, but this was before we added I2C-6's interrupt pin and keyway):
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front-panel frequency/event counter & control header:
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D/A anti-alias filter socket, and front-panel D/A connections:
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(This is the page shown in the picture at the end of the main web page about workbench computers.)


A/D anti-alias filter socket, and front-panel A/D connections:
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data converter socket locations:
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mezzanine connections:
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maximum mezzanine dimensions:
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mezzanine parts locations:
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mezzanine circuit for 65SIB, also PC keyboard and Dallas Semiconductor's (Dallas in now part of Maxim) 1-Wire interface:
I should have put a DIP switch on one of the 138's E inputs so an uninitialized VIA3PB doesn't enable anything, and S7 (switch 7) should optionally disable IRQs by shorting D4-A to ground. picture


65SIB header pinout on mezzanine:
picture


mezzanine header for raster graphics on an analog oscilloscope and for large memory on a serial interface:
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raster graphics on an analog oscilloscope, circuit built up on a separate board, not on Bench-1:
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LCD characters.  This page is cut out from a data sheet, and needed to be folded to fit in the tiny ring binder.
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other side of the LCD character page, showing instructions:
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LCD instructions, put another way:
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and other side:
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board-edge connector pinout:
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regulator circuit:
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The .25" 3-conductor phone jack for power was not a very good choice.  I'm not sure what the best would be; but there are a lot of things that need a higher plus and minus voltage (rather than just +5V or +3.3V), so unless you convert the voltage on the board itself with switching regulators, I still suggest using a plus and minus input, like ±10V.  The exact voltage is not critical at all for most things.  I use it to power:




My workbench computers <--Previous

last updated Nov 7, 2017